Regular Dental Cleanings Help Prevent Bad Breath and Gum Infection

 

Bad Breath: Cause, Effect & Solution

 

Everyone has been the cause a time or two, and everyone has smelled the effect of bad breath a time or two. So what causes this malodor that is reeks havoc in daily conversions? Bad breath is also known as halitosis, which by definition means an unpleasant odor exhaled when breathing. So what’s the cause? Bad breath is not always a simple poor hygiene issue. It can be a smelly warning that your health is failing.

 

One common cause is food and plaque formation. The breakdown of food particles around your teeth that lead to plaque and bacteria growth will cause a foul odor. The solution is simple here, brush, brush and brush and floss.

 

Eating foods containing volatile oils is another source, for example onions, garlic, some vegetables, and alcohol. When digested this foods release pungent oils that enter the bloodstream are carried through the lungs and exhaled when breathing. The solution is to warn your surrounding companions that you ate these types of food and your breath may smell.

 

Another common cause is a dental problem such as a gum infection and/or dental cavities. Both of these are caused by bacteria that their by-products (waste) result in an odor. The solution is good oral hygiene and regular dental exams to detect decay (cavities) as soon as possible. The diagnosis of gingivitis and periodontal disease is crucial in preventing or stabilizing bone loss around the teeth.

 

Dry mouth can cause “morning breath,” this occurs naturally during sleeping. Saliva helps cleanse and moisten the mouth, without adequate saliva dead cells accumulate on the tongue, cheeks and gums. The solution is to brush and floss upon waking. Some medications and smoking will also cause dry mouth. Increasing water intake will help keep the mouth moist.

 

Sinus infections due to nasal discharge can cause mouth odor. Strep throat, tonsillitis, mononucleosis, bronchitis and other upper respiratory infections are all sources of bad breath, until the infection clears.

 

Tobacco products are of course a smelly source that is very pungent and offensive. Tobacco users are also more likely to have periodontal disease, an additional source of bad breath.

 

Disease is a very serious cause that can be life threatening. Chronic lung infections and abscesses are very foul-smelling. Kidney failure can cause a urine-like smell. Liver failure may cause an odor described as “fishy.” Uncontrolled diabetes often has a fruity breath odor. Chronic reflux of stomach acids can also produce bad breath. This is a few diseases that are known to produce bad breath, although these are not exclusive.

 

If simple oral hygiene does not eliminate the bad breath, consult your hygienist or dentist as soon as possible. Your doctor can rule out any serious medical condition.

 

At Smiles for Life we believe in preventative hygiene

 

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